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SCHOOL FINANCE

Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2014–15 (Fiscal Year 2015) First Look

This First Look report introduces new data for national and state-level public elementary and
secondary revenues and expenditures for fiscal year (FY) 2015. Specifically, this report includes
the following school finance data:

  • revenue and expenditure totals;
  • revenues by source;
  • expenditures by function and object;
  • current expenditures; and
  • current expenditures per pupil.

Activate Research partnered with Picus Odden & Associates to develop 5 case studies as part of an analysis of the adequacy of Vermont’s school funding system Using the Evidence-Based Method to Identify Adequate Spending Levels for Vermont Schools. This primary research included qualitative data collection, data analysis, and the composition of case narratives.
*Academy Elementary School *Integrated Academy School
*Oak Grove Elementary School *Colchester High School
*Fair Haven Union High School

Instructional Staff Salary and Benefits Spending: 1991–2011
Between 1991 and 2011, spending on instructional staff compensation, including salary and benefits, comprised more than half of current expenditures for public elementary and secondary education. During this period, spending on instructional staff compensation increased nationally by $101 billion (54 percent), according to “Instructional Staff Salary and Benefits Spending: 1991–2011.” This Data Point focuses on how instructional staff salary and benefits spending changed from 1991–2011.

Activate helped develop a Data Point that focused on the Maryland Equity Project at the University of Maryland, College Park to conduct work as part of a study of the adequacy of funding for education in the state of Maryland. This primary research included qualitative data collection, data analysis, and the composition of case narratives of successful schools in multiple Maryland public school districts.

STEM

Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics

Gender Differences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Interest, Credits Earned, and NAEP Performance in the 12th Grade
Activate Research co-authored “Gender Differences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Interest, Credits Earned, and NAEP Performance in the 12th Grade,” a Statistics in Brief that describes high school graduate’s attitudes toward STEM courses (specifically, mathematics and science), credits earned in STEM fields, and performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics and science assessments in 2009.

NAEP

National Assessment of Educational Progress

Gender Differences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Interest, Credits Earned, and NAEP Performance in the 12th Grade
Activate Research co-authored “Gender Differences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Interest, Credits Earned, and NAEP Performance in the 12th Grade,” a Statistics in Brief that describes high school graduate’s attitudes toward STEM courses (specifically, mathematics and science), credits earned in STEM fields, and performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics and science assessments in 2009.

TEACHER POLICY

Adult Education Attainment and Assessment Scores: A Cross-National Comparison

Adults in their 20s in almost all of the participating countries had a larger gap between those who did not finish high school and high school graduates compared to the gap between high school graduates and those with at least an associate’s degree. This Statistics in Brief builds upon the findings in the earlier National Center for Education Statistics report to provide additional cross-national comparisons of adult literacy and numeracy proficiencies by education attainment. Specifically, the brief highlights differences between several countries in the average literacy and numeracy scores for adults at different levels of education attainment.

Public School Teacher Autonomy in the Classroom Across School Years 2003–04, 2007–08, and 2011–12

Compared to 2003–04, along nearly every teacher and school characteristic, larger percentages of teachers perceived low autonomy in 2007–08, with still larger percentages in 2011–12, according to “Public School Teacher Autonomy in the Classroom Across School Years 2003–04, 2007–08, and 2011–12.” This Statistics in Brief focuses on how teachers’ perceptions of autonomy have changed over these three school years, as well as how levels of teacher autonomy vary across selected teacher and school characteristics.

Teaching Vacancies and Difficult-to-Staff Teaching Positions in Public Schools
Activate Research co-authored “Teaching Vacancies and Difficult-to-Staff Teaching Positions in Public Schools.” Compared to the 1999–2000 school year, a lower percentage of public schools had at least one teaching vacancy in the 2011–12 school year, according to “Teaching Vacancies and Difficult-to-Staff Teaching Positions in Public Schools,” a Statistics in Brief that describes the percentages of public schools that reported that they had teaching vacancies and subject areas with difficult-to-staff teaching positions.

Teacher Job Satisfaction
In 2011–12, about 95 percent of public school teachers who agreed that the administration in their schools was supportive were satisfied with their jobs. This was 30 percentage points higher than the teachers who disagreed that the administration was supportive (65 percent), according to “Teacher Job Satisfaction.” This Data Point focuses on what percentage of teachers reported that they were satisfied with their jobs, and how did satisfaction vary between teachers in public and private schools in the 2003–04, 2007–08, and 2011–12 school years.

K-12 CLASSROOM

Statistics in Brief Image

How Principals in Public and Private Schools Used Their Time in 2011-12
This Statistics in Brief examines the mean percentage of time that principals reported spending on various activities in the 2011–12 school year, both overall and by selected school, staffing, and principal characteristics. Key findings from school year 2011-12 include: (1) Compared to private school principals, public school principals allocated smaller percentages of time to internal administrative tasks and parent interactions and a larger percentage of time to student interactions; (2) Principals in public schools with at least one assistance principal spent a smaller percentage of time on student interactions than their peers in schools with no assistant principals; and (3) In public schools, principals with a bachelor’s degree or less reported spending a smaller percentage of time on curriculum and teaching-related tasks than principals with a higher degree.

Instructional Time for Third- and Eighth-Graders in Public and Private Schools: School Year 2011-12
This Statistics in Brief examines the amount of time that students in grades 3 and 8 spent on different activities in 2011-12 and compares how, if at all, this time varied by activity, school sector, and grade. Based on reporting by school principals, on average, in school year 2011-12 third-graders in both public and in private schools spent a greater amount and a larger percentage of time on instruction in English, followed by mathematics, than on any other subject.

Public Elementary and Secondary School Arts Education Instructors
Activate Research co-authored “Public Elementary and Secondary School Arts Education Instructors.” This Statistics in Brief uses data from two administrations of the Fast Response Survey System to present findings related to the different types of school staff (e.g., full-time staff, part-time staff) used to provide arts instruction in public elementary and secondary schools.

Changes in America’s Public School Facilities: From School Year 1998-99 to School Year 2012-13
This Statistics in Brief summarizes the changes from the 1998-99 to the 2012-13 school years in the average age of public schools, rating of satisfaction of the environmental quality of school facilities, the cost to put school buildings in good overall condition, and short-range plans to improve school facilities.